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JWCH, Inc. - Norwalk
12360 Firestone Blvd
Norwalk, CA 90650
Metro Area
Los Angeles-Long Beach-Anaheim, CA

Facility Details

JWCH Institute Inc. is a private non-profit health agency that was established as the Attending Staff Association of the John Wesley County Hospital in 1960 by concerned L.A. County physicians. These staff physicians sought to establish an agency that could obtain additional funds to support and augment patient care, education, and research at the John Wesley facility. When the hospital was demolished in 1979, the agency continued its efforts to assist LA County patients, but the name was no longer relevant and was subsequently changed to JWCH Institute Inc.

The agency's current mission is to improve the health and wellness of underserved segments of the population of Los Angeles County through the direct provision or coordination of health care, health education services and research. The mission is being accomplished through a variety of programs and activities, such as medical outreach and referrals for medical care, HIV services and drug treatment; health education; psychosocial assessment and intervention; primary medical care; family planning services; and research.

Not only does JWCH provide comprehensive healthcare at the Wesley Health Centers (Norwalk), it also brings together a unique collaboration of numerous community organizations that provide services on site. These organizations include: The Oldtimers Foundation, ALMA Family Services, Inter-Community Child Guidance Center, Whittier Rio Hondo AIDS Project, Helpline Youth Counseling, LA Alcohol and Drug Programs.

Office Hours:
Monday-Friday: 8:00AM - 5:00PM

Services offered at Wesley Health Centers (Norwalk) include:

  • Primary Health Care
  • Dental Care (Dental clinic hours may vary.)
  • Pediatrics
  • Dental/Oral Health Care
  • Prenatal Care
  • Behavioral Health
  • Reproductive Health
  • Podiatry
  • HIV/STD Testing
  • Psychiatry
  • X-rays
  • Laboratory Services
  • Specialty Referrals

Community Details

Norwalk, CA

Additional Community Information
Additional Recreation Information

The area known as "Norwalk" was first home to the Shoshonean Native American tribe. They survived primarily on honey, an array of berries, acorns, sage, squirrels, rabbits, and birds. Their huts were part of the Sejat Indian village.

In the late 1760s, settlers and missions flourished under Spanish rule with the famous El Camino Real trail traversing the area. Manuel Nieto, a Spanish soldier, received a Spanish land grant (Rancho Los Nietos) in 1784 that included Norwalk.

After the Mexican-American War in 1848, the Rancho and mining days ended. Portions of the land were subdivided and made available for sale when California was admitted into the union of the United States. Word of this land development reached the Sproul Brothers in Oregon. They recalled the fertile land and huge sycamore trees they saw during an earlier visit to the Southern California area. In 1869, Atwood Sproul, on behalf of his brother, Gilbert, purchased 463 acres of land at $11 an acre in an area known as Corazon de Los Valles, or "Heart of the Valleys".

By 1873, railroads were being built in the area and the Sprouls deeded 23 acres stipulating a "passenger stop" clause in the deed. Three days after the Anaheim Branch Railroad crossed the "North-walk" for the first time, Gilbert Sproul surveyed a townsite. In 1874, the name was recorded officially as Norwalk. While a majority of the Norwalk countryside remained undeveloped during the 1880s, the Norwalk Station allowed potential residents the opportunity to visit the "country" from across the nation.

What are known as the "first families" to Norwalk (including the Sprouls, the Dewitts, the Settles, and the Orrs) settled in the area in the years before 1900. D.D. Johnston pioneered the first school system in Norwalk in 1880. Johnston was also responsible for the first real industry in town, a cheese factory, by furnishing Tom Lumbard with the money in 1882. Norwalk's prosperity was evident in the 1890s with the construction of a number of fine homes that were located in the middle of orchards, farms, and dairies. Headstones for these families can be found at Little Lake Cemetery, which was founded in 1843 on the border between Norwalk and Santa Fe Springs at Lakeland Road.

At the turn of the 19th century, Norwalk had become established as a dairy center. Of the 50 local families reported in the 1900 census, most were associated with farming or with the dairy industry. Norwalk was also the home of some of the largest sugar beet farms in all of Southern California during this era. Many of the dairy farmers who settled in Norwalk during the early part of the 20th century were Dutch.

After the 1950s, the Hispanic population in Norwalk grew significantly as the area became increasingly residential.

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